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Outlawe's in the East India Company


Lieutenant Henry Briggs, 2nd Madras Light Cavalry, 1832 (c) Online Collection National Army Museum, London - He was commissioned as a cornet in the 2nd Madras Light Cavalry in 1821 and promoted to lieutenant in 1824.

Painting of Lieutenant Henry Briggs -2nd Madras Light Cavalry in 1832 (probably close to what Capt. Robert Outlaw of the Madras Cavalry would have looked like) 

Robert Outlaw of Shropshire and son of Rev. Robert Outlaw, joins the EIC East India Company with Edward Clive, 1st Earl of Powis, also of Shropshire, in 1799 and travels to India as a cadet in the cavalry - later he rises to Captain and head the cavalry training facility at Arcot marries "Fanny" and has a family - He has a son Thomas FV Outlaw who later joins the Madras army and participates as a Lieut. in the Battle of Meanee in 1843 he dies a year later.   

There is the question as to who was Fanny?

A letter on the Indian army, addressed to the marquess of Tweeddale By John Briggs - 1842

The Cavalry and the Horse Artillery are almost all raised in the populous town of Arcot. 

It is, in truth, the recruiting depot of the mounted portion of the service. The town is full of pensioned and invalid soldiers and native officers, and perhaps this circumstance imparts an "esprit de corps" which exists in no other branch of the service to the same extent. The high character this body has ever held it still retains. 

There are no instances of sedition, like those which have marked the corps of Infantry during the last thirty years, though those mutinies have originated in a Mahomedan spirit; and Sir John Malcolm has truly remarked, "That in punishing the mutineers of Vellore, the swords of the native Cavalry were as deeply stained with the blood of their deluded brethren and fellow soldiers as were those of the English Dragoons."


Outlaw East India Timeline:

1775-1798 - Edward Clive, 1st Earl of Powis served as Lord Lieutenant of Shropshire
1798-1803 - Edward Clive, 1st Earl of Powis served as Governor of Madras
1798-1801 - Henrietta Clive's Travels in South India

1798
- Outlaw, Robert Cavalry . . 1798
1799
- Robert Outlaw, eldest son of Rev. Robert Outlaw, who has sailed to Madras as a cadet with the East India Company - Aug 12 1799
1799
- Cadet Papers  IOR/L/MIL/9/107  1789-1799 - Outlaw, Robert  IOR/L/MIL/9/107/147  [n.d.]

1801 - 3rd Regt. Native CavalryAug 18 1801 - Madras Promotions - Cornets - Lieut. R. Outlaw

1806 - Vellore Mutiny - on 10 July 1806 was the first instance of a large-scale and violent mutiny by Indian sepoys against the British East India Company - The revolt, which took place in the South Indian city of Vellore, was brief, lasting only one full day, but brutal as mutineers broke into the Vellore fort and killed or wounded 200 British troops, before they were subdued by reinforcements from nearby Arcot. - Amelia Farrer  - Vellore Mutiny

1809 - Observations on the disturbances in the Madras army in 1809 - Sir John Malcolm

1813 - 3d. N. I. 20th May 1813, vice Outlaw promoted (to Captain)

1815 - OUTLAW, Robert - son  born -  Robert b 25 Jul 1815
1816 - Thomas Floyer Vans Outlaw b 12 Jul 1816 [d 26 Mar 1844 ]

1816 - Cavalry Recruiting Depot was opened at Arcot under the command of Captain Outlaw of the 3rd Cavalry

1816 - OUTLAW, Thomas Floyer Vans 1816-1844  IOR/L/AG/23/10/1 no.3028  [n.d.] - Madras Army, b 12 Jul 1816, d 26 Mar 1844

1817-1818 - Third Anglo-Maratha War - was the final and decisive conflict between the British East India Company and the Maratha Empire in India. The war left the Company in control of most of India. It began with an invasion of the Maratha territory by 110,400 British East India Company troops, the largest such British controlled force massed in India. The troops were led by the Governor General Hastings and he was supported by a force under General Thomas Hislop. The operations began with action against Pindaris, a band of Muslim and Maratha robbers from central India.

1818 - Births - Dec - At Chittoor, the lady of Capt. Outlaw, of a daughter. - Chittoor - Fanny Outlaw Daughter

1819 - Outlaw, Robert cavalry . . 1798 - - Lieutenant : Aug. 18,1801 - Captain: May 20, 1813 - Died Oct. 25, 1819, at Fort St. George  Page 136-137 1819 - OUTLAW, Robert -1819Madras Army, d 25 Oct 1819 

1820 -
Henry F.L. Outlaw born -  Henry F.L. b Jul 1820, d 16 Dec 1833
1820
- Deaths - at Arcot, at the house of Capt. Outlaw, commanding cavalry depot, the infant son of Maj. Blanckley, H. M. 13th Dragoons - Arcot

1830 - Death - Nov, 20. At St. Cloud, Fanny, the relict of Captain Robert Outlaw, late of the Madras Cavalry.

1841 - Lieutenant Outlaw, 26th Native Infantry, commanded the company
1842 - Charles James Napier  was appointed Major General to the command of the Indian army within the Bombay Presidency
1842 - Officers served the company in Scinde : Lieutenant T. F. V. Outlaw, 26th Madras Native Infantry

1843 -
Distinguished themselves at the Battle of Meaunee Lieutenant Outlaw, commanding the company of Madras Sappers and Miners - The Battle of Miani (Meanee) 
1844
- Will of Thomas Floyer Vans Outlaw, Lieutenant in the 26th Regiment of Madras Native Infantry of Bombay East Indies - 10 June 1844 d 26 Mar 1844 - Outlaw, Thomas Floyer Vans 26th NI, d 44  IOR/L/MIL/11/45/125  [n.d.]


Some Genealogy to see how this comes about...

Thomas OUTLAW

Spouses/Children:
Sarah UNDERWOOD

Name Thomas OUTLAW Year 1783 Status or Occupation gent Place Irthlingborough County NTH Ref N Type A+W Series Book or Box bundle No 29 Jul Fo or pg Microform Notes ID PRO#1/041636.
Left everything to his wife Sarah. Also declaration that she was too infirm to act as executor, so St John Outlaw, son, was executor.

From "A visitation of the seats and arms of the noblemen and gentleman of Great Britain by Bernard Burke" (section about the Heddings) it says ; 

...  In 1620 we find the eldest branch of the family seated at Little Witchingham, in Norfolk, but in 1670 that branch became extinct, and a cousin, Henry Outlaw, Attorney-at-law, of Haddenham, in Cambridgeshire, then became the representative. He married a lady of good fortune, Miss Hare of Beckenham, in Kent, whose fortune was invested in the South Sea speculation ; after her husbands death, when she was quite advanced in years, she was taking a nap after dinner, according to her usual custom, when a neighbour, half frantic, rushed in, and throwing up his arms in an excited manner, exclaimed "Oh! Mrs Outlaw, we are all ruined! the South Sea speculation is all a bubble! we have lost everything!" she was so alarmed that she had a paralytic stroke, and died. Her only son Thomas, married Sarah Underwood, co-heiress of Thomas Underwood Esq., and their eldest son, Robert Outlaw, was Rector of Longford, in the county of Salop". So this gives us the name of Thomas' parents.

Legend Of The Outlaw Family by Keith Shore. In Footprints (Northants FHS Publication) Sept 1980;
"...... Thomas' father, St John Outlaw had been brought up by his parents (Thomas Outlaw and Sarah Underwood) at the Manor of Irthlingborough. I have recently been informed that a piece of Thomas' tombstone is close to the pulpit in Irthlingborough church and the remainder of the stone is close by. 

On the stone the county of Thomas' origin is shown as Cambridgeshire. ....... at this point my search changed to Ely and I learned that Sarah's sister, Ann Underwood, married Rev. R.Smith and that Thomas Outlaw had an uncle who, after being chaplain at Fotheringay, emigrated as a missionary to the Leeward Isles. This same Thomas' grandfather was another Thomas, who took for his second wife Elizabeth Brunsell, dau of Samuel Brunsell, Rector of Bingham, Notts. Her uncle, Henry, married Anna Wren, sister to Sir Christopher Wren ....... however my own direct family seem to have lived in the area of Stretham, Wilburton and Hadenham (vicinity of Ely) as Lords of the Manor ...... they seem to have lived in the area for at least 6 generations and I have been able to trace my line back with some certainty to 1478."

Brunsell family here; Nottinghamshire history Articles Articles from the Transactions of the Thoroton Society Autumn Excuraion 1908 Brunsall Hall

Rev. Robert OUTLAW J.P.

Spouses/Children:
Mary

Presumably he was also vicar of Longford by Newton.

From National Archives;
Robert Outlaw of Northamptonshire was admitted as a pensioner to Queens' College, Cambridge on 23 April 1765 and was awarded a BA in 1769. He was ordained as a deacon in September 1770 and was curate of Islip, 1770, curate of Sudborough, 1772-1781 (both Northamptonshire) and rector of Longford, Shropshire, 1773-1825. He died in 1825. His sister Ann married the Rev James Gibbs in April 1793; her sister was Mrs E H Hedding.

Robert OUTLAW

Letter from Ann Gibbs, Wellingborough, Northamptonshire to John Frewen, Cold Overton with general news and that her eldest brother, the Rev Robert Outlaw has been in London to see off his eldest son Robert, who has sailed to Madras as a cadet with the East India Company FRE/1499 12 Aug 1799

East-India Register & Directory;
Third Regiment Native Cavalry; Capt Robert Outlaw. 13 Oct 1817 On Furlough
Footnote says he is 'Com. cav. recruit. depot. Arcot".


A Capt. Robert Outlaw in India around 1818-1820

The Asiatic journal and monthly miscellany Vol 9 - East India Company 

1820 - Deaths - at Arcot, at the house of Capt. Outlaw, commanding cavalry depot, the infant son of Maj. Blanckley, H. M. 13th Dragoons - Arcot 

The Asiatic journal and monthly miscellany - Vol 6 East India Company

1818 - Births - Dec - At Chittoor, the lady of Capt. Outlaw, of a daughter. - Chittoor

Chittoor - is a city, a corporation and district head quarters located in the Chittoor District of Andhra Pradesh, India. It is located on the NH 4 linking the two major metropolitan cities of India, Bangalore and Chennai. The City has a population of 3,20,567 (2011 census).The Nearest Airports are Bangalore, Chennai and Tirupati.

Arcot,_Vellore - is a town and suburb of Vellore city in the state of Tamil Nadu, India. Located on the southern banks of Palar River at 1254′N 7920′E, the city straddles a highly strategic trade route between Chennai and Bangalore, between the Mysore Ghat and the Javadi Hills

In 1751, The English captured the town during the conflict between the United Kingdom and France for control of South India. English successfully held it with only 500 men against the French and the Nawab, resisting for 56 days (23 September to 14 November 1751). The enemy army eventually dissolved and its leader, Chanda Shahib, was killed. Mohammed Ali Khan Walajah took over as Nawab, effectively serving as a vassal of the British. His successors soon ran up enormous debts at the hands of English speculators. In 1801, the town was annexed by the British East India Company.

Chittoor - situated in the valley of the Ponni River, is a major town in the state of Andhra Pradesh. Its convenient location on the junction of NH 4 and NH 18 draws quite a number of tourists.

It is believed that some of the earliest settlers of Chittoor district were the Kurumbas. In the 8th and 9th century, Chittoor came under the Chola dynasty. In the 11th century, it was ruled by the Ballal dynasty, and later by the Vijayanagar kingdom. The East India Company entered in 1640 and made settlements, and Chittoor was a British military post until 1884.

Moodley-Paper - A Tale of Two Mutinies 1: Vellore 1806  and 2: The White Mutiny in Madras 1809: race, class and conciliation under the Raj

1806 - Vellore Mutiny - on 10 July 1806 was the first instance of a large-scale and violent mutiny by Indian sepoys against the British East India Company - The revolt, which took place in the South Indian city of Vellore, was brief, lasting only one full day, but brutal as mutineers broke into the Vellore fort and killed or wounded 200 British troops, before they were subdued by reinforcements from nearby Arcot.

The Monthly Review -  Amelia Farrer  - Vellore Mutiny

THE MUTINY AT VELLORE (JULY 1806)

[Exactly one hundred years ago, and almost exactly fifty years before the appalling mutiny which shook the British rule in India to its very foundations, a mutiny and massacre on a smaller scale occurred at Vellore, then a fortified town situated about eighty-eight miles to the west of Madras. After the conquest of Seringapatam in 1799, the whole of Tippoo Saib's family, twelve sons and eight daughters, were removed by the British to Vellore, which was fitted up for their residence, and a liberal allowance was made for their support. On July 10, 1806, a revolt and massacre took place in the town, in which some of the family of Tippoo were active participators. The causes which led to this mutiny, and the circumstances of it, are narrated in the following letter, which was written from Madras in September 1806 by a lady whose husband occupied a high position, and from which it will be gathered that the outbreak at Vellore was not an isolated attempt, but was intended to be followed up by others, the consequences of which might have been far more serious.]

Observations on the disturbances in the Madras army in 1809 - Sir John Malcolm

1817-1818 - Third Anglo-Maratha War - was the final and decisive conflict between the British East India Company and the Maratha Empire in India. The war left the Company in control of most of India. It began with an invasion of the Maratha territory by 110,400 British East India Company troops, the largest such British controlled force massed in India. The troops were led by the Governor General Hastings and he was supported by a force under General Thomas Hislop. The operations began with action against Pindaris, a band of Muslim and Maratha robbers from central India.


Robert Outlaw in Cavalry:

alphabeticallist00dodwuoft_bw.pdf 

M A D R A S    P R E S I D E N C Y
1819 - Outlaw, Robert cavalry . . 1798 - - Lieutenant : Aug. 18,1801 - Captain: May 20, 1813 - Died Oct. 25, 1819, at Fort St. George  Page 136-137

1801 - 3rd Regt. Native Cavalry -  Aug 18 1801 - Madras Promotions - Cornets - Lieut. R. Outlaw

1813 - 3d. N. I. 20th May 1813, vice Outlaw promoted

1816 - Cavalry Recruiting Depot was opened at Arcot under the command of Captain Outlaw of the 3rd Cavalry

History of the Madras army - Vol 3

Page 376-377

During November 1813, the "Madras Veterinary Establishment" was transferred from the Presidency town to Arcot. The number of boys to be educated as farriers was increased to fifty-eight, with the view of supplying the horse artillery, and body guard, as well as the cavalry. Each boy was to receive four pagodas per mensem, from which sum his messing, and necessaries were to be provided.

He was to be furnished annually, at the expense of Government, with one uniform jacket and one watering cap. A barrack was provided for the accommodation of the lads, with the same allowance of furniture as that for European soldiers.

On the 17th April 1816, the pay and allowances of Adjutants of native cavalry were fixed at Rs. 147 per mensem, viz., staff pay Rs. 62, allowance for a clerk Rs. 40, for stationery and candles Rs. 15, and Rs. 30 for a horse.

A recruiting depot for the general service of the cavalry was formed at Arcot in May 1816 under the command of Captain Outlaw 3rd cavalry. Each regiment was directed to furnish a detail consisting of 2 subadars, 2 jemadars, 8 havildars, 8 naigues, and 16 privates, to do duty at the depot. The staff was to consist of 1 riding-master and native adjutant, 1 drill havildar, 2 pay havildars, 1 drill naigue, 2 rough-riders first class, 2 rough-riders second class, 1 staff serjeant, 2 trumpeters, and the ordinary proportion of artificers.

200 recruits, 200 horses, 200 sets of horse appointments.

History of 8th King George V's Own Light Cavalry - In 1816, a Cavalry Recruiting Depot was opened at Arcot under the command of Captain Outlaw of the 3rd Cavalry, and each regiment had to furnish a detail of twenty native officers and N.C.Os....

Fort St. George, Madras; a short history of our first possession in India Penny, F. E. (Fanny Emily), d. 1939

Fort St George Madras - 1754

Fort St George (or historically, White Town) is the name of the first English (later British) fortress in India, founded in 1644[1] at the coastal city of Madras, the modern city of Chennai.
...
The East India Company, which had entered India around 1600 for trading activities, had begun licensed trading at Surat, which was its initial bastion. However, to secure its trade lines and commercial interests in the spice trade, it felt the necessity of a port closer to the Malaccan Straits, and succeeded in purchasing a piece of coastal land, originally called Chennirayarpattinam or Channapatnam, from a Vijayanagar chieftain named Damerla Chennappa Nayaka based in Chandragiri, where the Company began the construction of a harbour and a fort. The fort was completed on 23 April 1644, coinciding with St George's Day, celebrated in honour of the patron saint of England.
...
The Fort is a stronghold with six-meter high walls that withstood a number of assaults in the 18th century. It briefly passed into the possession of the French from 1746 to 1749, but was restored to Great Britain under the Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle, which ended the War of the Austrian Succession.
...
St. Mary's Church
is the oldest Anglican church in India. It was built between 1678 and 1680. The tombstones in its graveyard are the oldest English or British tombstones in India. This ancient prayer house solemnized the marriages of Robert Clive and Governor Elihu Yale, who later became the first benefactor of Yale University in the United States. The church is popularly known as the 'Westminster Abbey of the East'.

Chennai , also known as Madras /məˈdrs/, is the capital city of the Indian state of Tamil Nadu. Located on the Coromandel Coast off the Bay of Bengal, it is a major commercial, cultural, economic and educational center in South India. It is also known as the "Cultural Capital of South India".[5]

The area around Chennai had been part of successive South Indian kingdoms through centuries. The recorded history of the city began in the colonial times, specifically with the arrival of British East India Company and the establishment of Fort St. George in 1644. The British defended several attacks from the French colonial forces, and from the kingdom of Mysore, on Chennai's way to become a major naval port and presidency city by late eighteenth century. Following the independence of India, Chennai became the capital of Tamil Nadu and an important centre of regional politics that tended to bank on the Dravidian identity of the populace

1799 - Robert Outlaw, eldest son of Rev. Robert Outlaw, who has sailed to Madras as a cadet with the East India Company - Aug 12 1799

1799 - Cadet Papers  IOR/L/MIL/9/107  1789-1799 - Outlaw, Robert  IOR/L/MIL/9/107/147  [n.d.]


He marries "Fanny" and has sons Robert, Thomas,  Henry and a daughter Fanny ! Thomas Floyer Vans Outlaw joins the Army and dies young age of 28 ... Henry dies at age 13 , The son Robert we don't know ...


1819 - OUTLAW, Robert -1819Madras Army, d 25 Oct 1819 

Related information: L/AG/23/10/2 No. 324

Contents:
Madras Army, d 25 Oct 1819
m Fanny d 20 Nov 1830
Robert b 25 Jul 1815
Thomas b 12 Jul 1816 [d 26 Mar 1844 ] 
Fanny b 19 Jun 1818, m 27 Feb 1845
Henry F.L. b Jul 1820, d 16 Dec 1833

| - - - - - 

1816 - OUTLAW, Thomas Floyer Vans 1816-1844  IOR/L/AG/23/10/1 no.3028  [n.d.] - Madras Army, b 12 Jul 1816, d 26 Mar 1844

Outlaw, Thomas Floyer Vans 26th NI, d 44  IOR/L/MIL/11/45/125  [n.d.]

1830 - Death - Nov, 20. At St. Cloud, Fanny, the relict of Captain Robert Outlaw, late of the Madras Cavalry.

1844 - Will of Thomas Floyer Vans Outlaw, Lieutenant in the 26th Regiment of Madras Native Infantry of Bombay East Indies - 10 June 1844 d 26 Mar 1844


History of the 26th Regiment and Thomas FL Outlaw is mentioned:

The military history of the Madras engineers and pioneers, from 1743 up to the present time
...

186 MILITARY HISTORY OF THE MADRAS ENGINEERS

[ 1841-42.]

Shortly after its arrival at Quetta, the company was sent to Thobee, Moosbung, Turee, &c., to make the road in the 
direction of Kelat practicable for artillery. On this duty it was employed till June, and in July it returned to Quetta. 

At this time Lieutenant Outlaw, 26th Native Infantry, commanded the company, and Lieutenants Orr and Boileau, of the Madras Engineers, were attached to it. 

...

189  [ 1842.

The company (with the exception of that part with General Nott's force) assembled at Sukkur and crossed the Indus to 
Roree with the force under Major-General Sir Charles Napier. 

The following officers served with the company in Scinde :  

Brevet Captain Henderson, Madras Engineers. 
Lieutenant T. F. V. Outlaw, 26th Madras Native Infantry
First Lieutenant C. A. Orr, Madras Engineers. 
Second Lieutenant A. J. M. Boileau, Madras Engineers. 
Assistant Surgeon Carlow, Medical Department. 
...

The Battle of Miani (Meanee) 

197 
...
The sepoys now began slowly to recede, but the General was there, and brought them up again. On one occasion Sir Charles Napier was assailed by a chief, but Lieutenant Marston of the 23rd slew the sirdar. 

For three and a half hours this fierce fight continued. During all this time the grenadiers of the 22nd maintained their post at the opening from the shikargah. Major Clibborne should have stormed Kathree, but instead of doing so kept his sepoy grenadiers in a position where they were but slightly engaged. 

The General perceived this, and sent orders to Colonel Pattle, second in command, to charge with all the Bengal and Scinde cavalry on the right. This order was at once carried out. Major Storey led the Bengal troopers on the enemy's infantry to the left, while the Scinde Horse fell on the Ameer's camp and cavalry. Now the Beloochees began to waver. The 22nd leapt forward, pushed them into the ravine, and closed in combat again ; the Madras Sappers did the like, the Sepoys followed, and at the same time those in the shikargah abandoned that cover and joined the left, where the conflict was renewed. The battle was, however, lost, and the Beloochees began to retreat slowly, but with no marks of fear. The victors followed closely. Two or three thousand Beloochees kept their position on the extreme left, but the British guns were turned on them, and they at last went off also. 

The General now halted his army, recalled his cavalry, and formed a large square, placing baggage and camp-followers in the centre. During the battle it is recorded that in every quarter astonishing feats of personal bravery were performed. 

Twenty officers, including four field officers, went down in battle, six being killed ; 250 sergeants and privates, of whom 
sixty were killed. The loss of the Beloochees was enormous ; carefully computed to be 6,000. A thousand bodies were heaped in the Fullailee alone. In four hours 2,000 men struck down 6,000, three to each man.  


198  [1843

The General, at break of day, sent word to the Ameers that he would storm Hydrabad if they did not surrender. Soon after noon six Ameers entered his camp and offered themselves as prisoners. 

...

On the 19th the army took possession of the city of Hydrabad, and next day the fortress was occupied. 

Fifty-five officers were mentioned in the General's despatches as having distinguished themselves at the battle of Meaunee
Amongst them were Major Waddington, Bombay Engineers; 
Captain Henderson, Madras Engineers ; Lieutenant Brown, 
Bengal Engineers ; Boileau, Madras Engineers ; and 
Lieutenant Outlaw, commanding the company of Madras Sappers and Miners

In a letter, Sir Charles Napier made honourable mention of Subadar Tondroyen, of the Sappers, as follows :  

'' At the battle of Meannee, Subadar Tondroyen led his company most gallantly down into the bed of the Fullailee. He 
followed Major Henderson, his commanding officer, who for that gallant action received the Companionship of the Bath. 
At this time the part where these two brave men led was about the most dangerous part of the field. I saw with admiration 
the boldness of the behaviour of the company and its commander, and the Subadar was at his side on all occasions. This 
old warrior's courage, energy, and great bodily exertions excited my admiration, and Major Henderson can confirm my opinion of him. If I am entitled to the Bed Ribbon of the Bath, he is to the Order of Merit." 

Captain Henderson captured one of the enemy's standards, which he presented to the head-quarters of the Corps. 

 
February 17, 1843 Location Miani

In his despatch after the battle of Meannee, dated 18th February 1843, Sir Charles Napier thus notices the Engineers and Sappers :  

" Captain Henderson, of the Madras Engineers, took a standard, and did good service with his excellent little band of Sappers and Miners, not only in this engagement, but through the campaign. His Lieutenants, Boileau and Outlaw, have also distinguished themselves." 

Captain Henderson received a brevet-majority and a C.B. 

203 1843

...

At last the enemy were obliged to quit the village, when they were pursued by the cavalry, which completed the rout of the 
right of the enemy's line. While this was going on on our left, the right of our line was also actively engaged. 

When the commotion and movement of the enemy, previously noticed, took place towards their right, it was discovered that some of the enemy had taken Bight towards their left. The Bombay Cavalry and Scinde Horse immediately charged, and slew many of the fugitives. 

The other three regiments of Native Infantry (1st, 8th and 12th) continued their advance and crossed the canals ; but our 
cavalry being amongst the enemy in their front, they had to cease firing. Opposition now soon ceased. The field was ours, 
and the whole of our force formed line along the bank of the Fullailee, east of Dubba. 

With regard to the company of Sappers : after the infantry were ordered to advance the artillery could no longer use their guns, and the men were formed up and left under command of Lieutenant Outlaw, with the artillery. Captain Henderson proceeded on and crossed the canals ; Lieutenants Outlaw and Boileau soon followed with the company, as it was found that the artillery were not to advance over the canals

But by this time the enemy began to take to flight, and as the artillery were ordered to form line on the bank of the Fullailee, the Sappers returned to assist the heavy battery over difficult ground. Captain Henderson, in his report, mentions the great assistance he received from Lieutenants Outlaw and Boileau, and the excellent conduct of Jemadar Tondroyen and the whole company. 

Corporal McDonough, of the Sappers, received a matchlock- ball in his foot. 

| - - - - - - 

Charles James Napier - , GCB (10 August 1782  29 August 1853), was a general of the British Empire and the British Army's Commander-in-Chief in India, notable for conquering the Sindh Province in what is now Pakistan.

...

In 1842, at the age of 60, Napier was appointed Major General to the command of the Indian army within the Bombay Presidency. Here Lord Ellenborough's policy led Napier to Sindh Province (Scinde), for the purpose of quelling the insurrection of the Muslim rulers who had remained hostile to the British Empire following the First Anglo-Afghan War. Napier's campaign against these chieftains resulted in victories in the Battle of Miani (Meanee) against General Hoshu Sheedi and the Battle of Hyderabad, and then the subjugation of the Sindh Province, and its annexation by its eastern neighbors.

On 4 July 1843, Napier was appointed Knight Grand Cross in the military division of the Order of the Bath, in recognition of his leading the victories at Miani and Hyderabad.[3]

Napier was appointed Governor of the Bombay Presidency by Lord Ellenborough. However, under his leadership the administration clashed with the policies of the directors of the British East India Company, and Napier was accordingly removed from office and returned home in disgust.

| - - - - 

The National Archives - Robert Outlaw

Letter from Ann Gibbs, Wellingborough, Northamptonshire to John Frewen, Cold Overton with general news and that her eldest brother, the Rev Robert Outlaw has been in London to see off his eldest son Robert, who has sailed to Madras as a cadet with the East India Company  FRE/1499  12 Aug 1799

Letter from Ann Gibbs, Wellingborough, Northamptonshire to John Frewen, Cold Overton with hopes of seeing or hearing from him soon, her recent illness, the birth of a son and that her brother's son at Madras has been promoted to Lieutenant  FRE/1534  17 Nov 1800

Ann Gibbs - She was the sister of the Rev Robert Outlaw of Longford, Shropshire and Mrs Ann Gibbs, the wife of the Rev James Gibbs of Wellingborough, Northamptonshire.

Administrative history:
Robert Outlaw of Northamptonshire was admitted as a pensioner to Queens' College, Cambridge on 23 April 1765 and was awarded a BA in 1769. He was ordained as a deacon in September 1770 and was curate of Islip, 1770, curate of Sudborough, 1772-1781 (both Northamptonshire) and rector of Longford, Shropshire, 1773-1825. He died in 1825. His sister Ann married the Rev James Gibbs in April 1793; her sister was Mrs E H Hedding

Robert OUTLAW

East-India Register & Directory;
Third Regiment Native Cavalry; Capt Robert Outlaw. 13 Oct 1817 On Furlough
Footnote says he is 'Com. cav. recruit. depot. Arcot"

But now we know he was married and had a Daughter at Chittoor in 1818 and had a home at Arcot . Also Robert is referred to as the "Eldest son" so who was the younger son?

As to WHY Robert Outlaw joined the Cavalry and left for India , It may have to do with Edward Clive son of Lord Clive of India  who was also from Shropshire and who left for Madras the same year Robert joined the Cavalry in 1798...

MINIATURE PORTRAIT OF EDWARD CLIVE, 2nd LORD CLIVE, 1st EARL OF POWIS (3rd CREATION) by Gervase Spencer, in the Gateway Room at Powis Castle -- Powis Castle & Garden -- High quality art prints, canvases, postcards -- National Trust Prints

Edward Clive, 1st Earl of Powis - (7 March 1754 16 May 1839), known as the Lord Clive between 1774 and 1804, was a British politician.

Powis was the eldest son of Robert Clive, 1st Baron Clive ("Clive of India") and Margaret, daughter of Edmund Maskelyne. He was born at Queen's Square, Bloomsbury, London, and was educated at Eton College and Christ Church College, Oxford

Edward Clive succeeded his father as Baron Clive of Plassey co Clare in 1774. However, as this was an Irish peerage, it did not entitle him to a seat in the British House of Lords (although it did entitle him to a seat in the Irish House of Lords). The same year he was instead elected to the House of Commons for Ludlow, a seat he held until 1794. He was a member of Board of Agriculture in 1793.[1]

Although almost certainly this was a belated act of contrition by the Crown for the lack of recognition to his father, he was on 13th August 1794 created Baron Clive, of Walcot in the County of Shropshire, in the Peerage of Great Britain, and consequently took his seat in the House of Lords.

Edward Clive also served as Lord Lieutenant of Shropshire from 1775 to 1798 and from 1804 to 1839 and as Lord Lieutenant of Montgomeryshire from 1804 to 1830. He was Recorder of the boroughs of Shrewsbury in 1775, and Ludlow in 1801.[1] He also held commission in the British Army as a full Colonel in 1779

He had a distinguished career in India where he was Governor of Madras from 1798 to 1803, returning home to the thanks of both Houses of Parliament

 

Birds of Passage Henrietta Clive's Travels in South India 1798-1801 - Nancy K. Shields

Eland, May 15, 2010 - 328 pages
`Fourteen elephants were employed to carry our tents, which consisted of two large round tents, six field officers, three Captains and several smaller tents for the cavalry, infantry &c. by whom we were escorted. Four elephants were employed in carrying a part of our baggage; two were not loaded that had been trained for carrying howdahs, which we sometimes rode when the weather was not too oppressive. We had two camels, which were mostly used for carrying messages, and one hundred bullocks to draw the bandies in which all the rest of our baggage was to be conveyed.'

The journals of Lady Henrietta Clive, a feisty, independent-minded traveller, are among the very earliest written accounts of India by a British woman. Married to Lord Edward Clive, son of Clive of India and Governor of Madras (1798-1803), she travelled through southern India with her daughters and retinue in the aftermath of the war against Tipu Sultan.

In this their first publication, Nancy K Shields skillfully interweaves extracts from the journals with passages from the diary of Charly, Henrietta's precocious twelve-year-old daughter, who went on to tutor the future Queen Victoria, first Empress of India. She also includes extracts from Henrietta's impassioned correspondence with her beloved, Byronic brother, the rakish George Herbert, Earl of Powis, beside whom Edward Clive appears to have been a very dull spouse.

Important as an historical and as a social document, and also as an early female travel text, Birds of Passage is illustrated with watercolours by Anna Tonelli, who accompanied the party on their voyage.


As an interesting aside there are records in the Shakespeare library regarding wills of properties Stratford-upon-Avon - Does this relate to the earlier Henry Outlaw (see research page 2 and  4 ) connection to Richard Burbage?

Here are those links:

The National Archives - Chapel Street, Stratford-upon-Avon  - Will of John Lord of Stratford-upon-Avon, gent

Contents:
Copy of the will of John Lord of Stratford-upon-Avon, gent., whereby he devised to his friends John Whitehead of Barford, Jeffery Bevington Lowe of Eatington and Robert Bell Wheler of Stratford-upon-Avon., gent., of all his real and personal property upon trust for his wife Ann for her life and thereafter as to and concerning his freehold and leasehold property to convey to his cousin William Lord of Shipston-upon-Stour his messuage with appurtenances called the Falcon situate at the southwest corner of Chapel Street then in the tenure of widow Ashfield and also a piece of garden ground in Scholars Lane and to convey to his cousin Elizabeth Lord, sister of the said William Lord, the messuage wherein he then dwelt (thereto-fore Frensham's) in Chapel Street with garden and appurtenances; also another messuage with appurtenances on the southside of, and adjoining to, the last in Chapel Street then in the occupation of Mrs. Taylor; also to convey to his cousin Mary Bellamy, sister of the said William and Elizabeth Lord and wife of John Byrkin Bellamy of Shipston-upon-Stour, gent., four messuages with gardens and appurtenances in Swine Street, then in the occupation of William Tims and others, also four messuages with appurtenances in the Rother Market adjoining the lane leading from the Birmingham and Alcester Roads into the Evesham Road, which last mentioned messuages the testator theretofore erected upon the site of the barn and yard which he purchased with Rowley Grounds from William Brook Smith, and the testator directed that his trustees and executors should pay the rents and profits of grounds called Rowley Grounds in the parish of Old Stratford adjoining the Stratford to Warwick turnpike road which he theretofore purchased of William Brook Smith, and also of two leasehold messuages with warehouses and appurtenances in St. Paul's Square, Birmingham, which the testator theretofore purchased from the executors of his wife's late brother, William Eaves of Stratford-upon-Avon, deceased, to Mrs. Elizabeth Davenport Hobbes of Stratford-upon-Avon, widow of Robert Hobbes, deceased, for her life and after her death to hold the same in trust for the child or children of the said Mrs. Hobbes equally and upon further trust to pay the rents and profits of several leasehold messuages in Shutt Lane, Park Street and Canal Street, Birmingham, which premises were also purchased by the testator of the executors of the said William Eaves, to the testator's wife's nephew Thomas Wardell of Sutton Coldfield for his life and thereafter to hold the same upon trust for the child or children of the said Thomas Wardell equally, and as to and concerning the testator's personal estate (after the death of his said wife) he made bequests to be paid to the children of William Brooks of ER60/6 Clements Row, Milk Street, Cheapside, London, by Eliza or Elizabeth his wife, who was a daughter of the testator and then lately deceased, to his daughter Mary, wife of Moses Backhouse of Coventry, dealer in glass and earthenware, and her children; to John Hathaway Turbitt of Halford, gentleman, to Mary and Ann the twin daughters of the Rev. Robert Outlaw of Brockton, Salop, clerk, to Frances, Anne, Elizabeth and Mary, the four daughters of Richard Wyatt of Stratford-upon-Avon, gentleman, to the treasures of the General Hospital at Birmingham; to the said John Whitehead, Jeffery Bevington Lowe and Robert Bell Wheler and to his servants and he directed his said trustees to hold the residue of his said personal estate upon trust to divide the same between the children of the said Mrs. Elizabeth Davenport Hobbes living at the testator's decease equally and the testator appointed the said John Whitehead, Jeffery Bevington Lowe and Robert Bell Wheler to be his executors.
Witnesses: Catherine Hitchcocks, Mary Hitchcocks and Elizabeth Hitchcocks.
Proved at London 2nd October 1827 by all the said executors. 9 f.

The National Archives - Miscellaneous papers relating to the Lord family and the Shakespeare Hotel, Stratford-upon-Avon - the will 23 Feb. 1822 of John Lord of Stratford-upon-Avon, gent

Contents:
Copy probate of the will 23 Feb. 1822 of John Lord of Stratford-upon-Avon, gent., bequeathing all his real and personal estate to trustees for the benefit of his wife, Ann Lord, for life, and, after her death in trust as follows:
- to convey to his cousin, William Lord of Shipston-on-Stour his messuage in Chapel Street, Stratford-upon-Avon, called the Falcon, now in the tenure of Widow Ashfield, and a piece of garden in Scholars Lane now in the testator's possession
- to convey to his cousin, Elizabeth Lord, sister of William Lord, a messuage "(heretofore Meacham's)" in Chapel Street wherein the testator now lives, and another messuage adjoining the last on the south side, now in the tenure of Miss Taylor
- to convey to his cousin, Mary Bellamy, sister of Elizabeth and William Lord and wife of John Byrkin Bellamy of Shipston-on-Stour, gent., his four tenements in Swine Street, now in the tenures of William Tims and others and his four messuages at the back of the Rother Market, built on land purchased from Mr. Brook Smith, in the several tenures of --- Court and others.
- to pay to Mrs. Elizabeth Davenport Hobbes for life the income from several inclosed grounds called the Rowley Grounds in Old Stratford near the Warwick Road, purchased from Mr. Brook Smith, and from two leasehold messuages in Saint Paul's Square, Birmingham, purchased from the executors of his late wife's brother, William Eaves of Stratford-upon-Avon
- to pay to his late wife's nephew, Thomas Wardell of Sutton Coldfield, for life, the income from his leasehold messuages in Shut Lane, Park Street and Canal Street, Birmingham, also purchased from the executors of William Eaves.
- to pay pecuniary legacies to the six children of William Brooks of Cheapside, London, by Eliza, the testator's natural daughter; his natural daughter Mary, wife of Moses Backhouse of Coventry, dealer in glass and earthenware; John Hathaway Turbitt of Halford, gent.; Mary and Anne, twin daughters of the Reverend Robert Outlaw of Brockton, co. Salop., clerk; Frances, Anne, Elizabeth and Mary, the four daughters of Richard Wyatt of Stratford-upon-Avon, gent.

The National Archives - Deeds relating mainly to property in Rother Street, Stratford-upon-Avon - Will of Thomas Chapman Sheldon, dated 15 July 1829

Contents: 
Will of Thomas Chapman Sheldon, dated 15 July 1829, with the following bequests:
i) to trustees, James George and Septimus Sutton Lowe of Stratford-upon-Avon, leasehold messuage and adjoining freehold garden ground and buildings in Rother Street in the tenure of John Mills Esq., in trust to sell and divide the money between the children of Richard Bartlet by his Aunt Peggy his wife
ii) to his cousin, Richard Corbett of Quinton (son of Michael Corbett by his late aunt Elizabeth) his lands at Bretforton now occupied by.... Rimell charged with certain annuities
iii) to his said trustees his several freehold messuages in Henley Street and Meer Pool Lane occupied by.... Cross and others and his leasehold messuage called the George and Dragon in Henley Street now occupied by Thomas Chandler, in trust to sell and divide the money between his cousins, Elizabeth and Mary Corbett, sisters of the said Richard Corbett
iv) to Rebecca Corbett, another sister of the said Richard, a freehold messuage in Ely Street in the tenure of William Thompson
v) to James George a freehold messuage in Ely Street occupied by Miss Outlaws, a freehold tenement in High Street in the tenure of himself and his co-partner, James George, and his freehold land in Old Stratford; to hold for life with reversion to the said Rebecca Corbett

The Project Gutenberg - Shakespeare's Family, by Mrs. C. C. Stopes.



 

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